Praia do Lázaro | Ubatuba | Brazil

With our newfound freedom, Felipe and I decided to drive to the beach for the day. We arrived in Ubatuba in the early afternoon and packed a picnic for the beach. We drove around until we found a beach with minimal number of sunbathers and staked out a place for the afternoon. We also found milho verde (corn ice cream), which had thus far been elusive.

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Unfortunately, a local recommended that we take the coastal road back to Sāo Paulo. Even more unfortunately, we listened to him. Bad call. Not only was the two lane road at an almost standstill, the car started to make a strange noise about halfway into our journey home. The noise got so loud that we stopped to change the tire just to make sure that it wasn't something in the wheel. The noise continued and at that point, it was dusk, raining and the gps looked like this:

No, that's not a child's scribble, that is a twisty road straight uphill through the mountains. So we gave up for the day and let the Brazilian road win. We called it a night in Caraguattuba and waited for a tow truck and taxi to deliver us back to the city the next day (thankfully the insurance worked just as it described that it would). We arrived without further interruption.

School | Pumpkins

One of the things I miss most about living outside of the States is autumn. The changing leaves, the changing weather and pumpkin spice flavored everything. To satisfy my fall craving, I compiled a math mini unit completely centered around pumpkins. We estimated how many seeds were inside each pumpkin and then broke them open to count how many were actually there (the results of which greatly exceeded my estimations). Then we dyed the seeds, graphed the colors, and practiced patterning. Living outside of the States also means a lack of canned pumpkin but I've perfected the art of boiling and mashing the fresh stuff, which I saved from our carving and put to use in this pumpkin bread with streusel topping. The kids were generally disgusted at the thought of eating a sweet vegetable but I was so proud that they all tried it...and liked it!